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Ask me anything   Helena ❖ 19❖ Australia

I like to draw things
also I have a very dark sense of humor


lifehack:

hanseofficial:

instead of setting your alarm in the morning, why not try setting a b-larm? instead of playing a loud and repetitive sound, tens of thousands of bees burst forth from the alarm clock. you’re not getting up today

— 1 week ago with 30 notes

maegalcarwenraven:

Here is what to do with some old, broken terracotta pots!

(via hanseofficial)

— 1 week ago with 22643 notes
"fernweh [feyrn-vey]"
(noun) This wonderful, untranslatable German word describes the feeling of homesickness for a far away land, a place you have never visited. Do not confuse this with the english word, wanderlust; Fernweh is much more profound, it is the feeling of an unsatisfied urge to escape and discover new places, almost a sort of sadness. You miss a place you have never experienced, as opposed to lusting over it or desiring it like wanderlust. You are seeking freedom and self-discovery, but not a particular home.  (via dietcrackcocaine)

(Source: wordsnquotes.com, via lstu)

— 1 week ago with 15649 notes

archiemcphee:

Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

"Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.

(via flavorcats)

— 1 week ago with 5017 notes

lustyloveylady:

This is still one of the most perfect adaptations ever made

(Source: the-attic-to-the-left, via yanakimchipancake)

— 2 weeks ago with 107549 notes